Patient Stories

Patient Stories

Like many disabling disorders, hyperacusis is invisible. The sounds that cause pain are also invisible — yet the impact is profound. Hyperacusis affects every aspect of a person’s life — work, home, school, family, friends. Setbacks are common, setting off new cycles of pain that can last indefinitely.

The following are a few guidelines to go by if you can. But it’s most important to tell your story in your own words.

What do you think started your hyperacusis? What is your history of noise / music / headphone exposure? What is the pain like and how long does it last? What triggers new cycles of pain? Has any management approach made a difference for you? How has hyperacusis altered your life? Please also do not make your story too “short” or too “long” – in between is perfect, around 800 to 1,000 words.

If you would like to share your story, please contact us here.

Read Patient Stories

Jemma’s story: I am enslaved by sound

Jemma’s story: I am enslaved by sound

I am 18 and just graduated from high school. I have had both loudness and pain hyperacusis for 11 years. I was born with cataracts and sensory processing disorder. When I was 7, I began to develop chronic migraines. Over time, everyday noises began to trigger severe...

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Help Find a Cure for Cindy’s Air Horn Injury!

Help Find a Cure for Cindy’s Air Horn Injury!

One evening a year ago, Cindy Redmond was at a friend’s house. Her friend’s stepfather, annoyed that Cindy was chatting on her phone at the table, blasted her with an air horn. Cindy felt a burst of pain in her ears. Within days, she could no longer attend school.

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I Would Rather Lose My Teeth Than Have Hyperacusis

I Would Rather Lose My Teeth Than Have Hyperacusis

I loved my career as a registered dental hygienist. It was very rewarding and I loved my patients. My days were filled with the piercing whine of dental equipment, with my head positioned just inches from the motorized whirr. I never thought twice about the noise....

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A jaw injury made every sound torture for this model

A jaw injury made every sound torture for this model

Katrina Caro's hyperacusis developed after a blow to the face. The sobering story of her injury and its aftermath is told in the New York Post. Katrina was working as a nightclub waitress when she was punched in the jaw. What appeared to be a dental injury turned out...

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Low-level Laser Therapy: One Patient’s Experience

Low-level Laser Therapy: One Patient’s Experience

I would like to summarize my personal experience with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and some implications for improving our understanding of hyperacusis diagnosis and treatment. Like most people with hyperacusis, my journey has been long and complex.

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LB’s Hyperacusis Story: My guitar had to be loud

LB’s Hyperacusis Story: My guitar had to be loud

I have always listened to loud music and played loud music, thinking the worst that could go wrong was mild hearing loss when I’m old. At age 14, I started listening to loud music through earbuds. When I started playing bass guitar, it had to be loud or I wouldn’t be...

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My Hyperacusis Story: A Personal Account By TM

My Hyperacusis Story: A Personal Account By TM

On February 28, 2014, when my ear started ringing out of nowhere, my life was changed forever. That night I first started to notice signs that I had hyperacusis. I’ve thought long and hard about this night and the days that followed trying to piece together how...

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